CARTE DE VISITE

13 Nov 2011

Absolutely fascinating.

Absolutely fascinating.

28 Oct 2011

I’m starting a new tag to talk about one of my favorite topics: #art history

This is closely associated with personal devotion and prayer for me (largely awakened by Nouwen’s “The Return of the Prodigal Son" and Sister Wendy Beckett’s many books on masterpieces and devotional observances).

I was reading through “Joy Lasts" this morning and I came across the image above (Masaccio, Saint Andrew, 1426).  I don’t enjoy iconography much.  It’s difficult to connect to.  In fact, even the above image I have trouble with.  But what I did like was the subtlety of Saint Andrew’s halo.

Normally, as Wikipedia notes1, halos, “represent light [that is] most often depicted as golden, yellow, white, or red when flames2 are depicted.”  Masaccio’s version shows an almost invisible dignity and richness.  It is not blinding.  It is not delicate or alien.  To me, it suggests the blessing and richness that comes from the walk and time spent with the King and Saviour.3



http://bit.ly/4CzBLs ↩



While there may be examples of Christian iconography with Red, flaming halos (none that I could find), Wikipedia is making a statement that spans across multiple faiths to encompass all examples of halos. ↩



Let me add as an afterthought, that this image - in general - is not terribly inspiring.  Beckett also points this out.  This is “religious art” but not “spiritual art;” it doesn’t beckon the viewer in.  I am simply teasing one aspect out (weakly at that). ↩

I’m starting a new tag to talk about one of my favorite topics: #art history

This is closely associated with personal devotion and prayer for me (largely awakened by Nouwen’s “The Return of the Prodigal Son" and Sister Wendy Beckett’s many books on masterpieces and devotional observances).

I was reading through “Joy Lasts" this morning and I came across the image above (Masaccio, Saint Andrew, 1426). I don’t enjoy iconography much. It’s difficult to connect to. In fact, even the above image I have trouble with. But what I did like was the subtlety of Saint Andrew’s halo.

Normally, as Wikipedia notes1, halos, “represent light [that is] most often depicted as golden, yellow, white, or red when flames2 are depicted.” Masaccio’s version shows an almost invisible dignity and richness. It is not blinding. It is not delicate or alien. To me, it suggests the blessing and richness that comes from the walk and time spent with the King and Saviour.3


  1. http://bit.ly/4CzBLs 

  2. While there may be examples of Christian iconography with Red, flaming halos (none that I could find), Wikipedia is making a statement that spans across multiple faiths to encompass all examples of halos. 

  3. Let me add as an afterthought, that this image - in general - is not terribly inspiring. Beckett also points this out. This is “religious art” but not “spiritual art;” it doesn’t beckon the viewer in. I am simply teasing one aspect out (weakly at that). 

25 Dec 2008

For contemplation - along with this: link

(via upload.wikimedia.org)

For contemplation - along with this: link

(via upload.wikimedia.org)