CARTE DE VISITE

30 Aug 2014

Kyle Origami Wallet update:
Following up on my last post, I experimented with a new insert. Since the classic wallet typically held photos of loved ones, I began to wonder if this could be done with a paper version.

My insert comprises 4 pages, made from manilla envelope stock. The size is just perfect for a 3.5” x 5” photo.

Photos are held in place by mimicking the class “photo corners” of old-time photo albums. 4 simple diagonal slits by each corner, for the photo to be fitted into, holds the photo perfectly. Future iterations might include a wax paper insertion to cover each photo.

Paper comes from paper-source.

30 Aug 2014

Kyle Origami Wallet update:
Following up on my last post, I worked a new insert into this specially made “Sovereign Chess" Wallet. Rather than blank notes, it holds 3 sets of chess notation sheets and a copy of the 16 Rules of Sovereign Chess.

Paper from Paper-Source.

26 Aug 2014

We recently came into possession of a bike trailer that works well with our Brompton bicycles. The only problem? Rather difficult to attach to the bike when you are by yourself. Since the Brompton does not “kickstand” the way a traditional bike does - requiring folding - this created a two-fold problem:

1 - The bike needs to be fully locked into play in order to attach the trailer.
2 - The bike does not accommodate traditional kickstands because the kickstands either interfere with the folding processes of the bike or are oversized to the frame of the Brompton.

The solution?
A 16” rear axle mounting bicycle kickstand - or a “Wald” mount.
The kickstand is easy to install, stays out of the way of the folding-up process and does not get in the way of your stride when walking/carrying the bike.

Again, this is one of the instances where I was scouring the internet for solutions to a very niche problem. I put this out there in the hopes that others who might be in a similar pickle might find this useful.

cf: http://bit.ly/WALDMOUNT

26 Aug 2014

Wrote on behalf of Cinema In Focus today. Got picked up by #Noozhawk. Also ran through the points in this video. Had a great time using #screenflow.

23 Aug 2014

18 Aug 2014

I recently came across this great photo on Pinterest, depicting an origami wallet. Naturally, I scoured the internet trying to find instructions or source information. All I had to go on was what was depicted in the design credit: “Design: Hedi Kyle” I became so frustrated because as I ran through various leads on Google, I saw:

  • Some instruction but it was so poorly written, it was unfollowable
  • Some mention of “Hedi Kyle” but not definitive enough to tell where to find instructions
  • A mention of “Hedi Kyle” in connection to a book by Helen Hiebert, “Playing with Paper" but nothing was ever clear enough to tell me if the book merely mentions Kyle’s work or if it publishes the instructions as a whole (??). Naturally, I called bookstores, wishing to look through the book before buying but nobody was stocked with it. It was not available electronically, except on the Nook (not my favorite). I finally risked and just bought the book. It had it.
I write all this to say, if you end up being like me and want to make this thing, "it’s in the book" - you are safe to buy it. There. I spelled out what the internet was too vague to do. Hopefully the Google and Bing elves will crawl through this post and you’ll be able to find this bit of useful information.

While it is my view that, in principle, “origami is free”… I won’t be publishing my own instructions - even though I think I could improve on both the book and the internet. I have no need to debate this principle with any lawyers.

Lastly, Kyle/Hiebert did some beautiful work in putting together instructions for a wallet/notebook. With some slight modification, I was able to make a wallet with “inner pockets” - more like a traditional wallet. Further, I determined measurements that would make the pockets more of a “business card” size. I list them below.

Original sheet of paper measured to 12” x 20”
I reduced mine to 10” x 16.6”

Orignal measurement calls for an 8” mark
My mark comes in at 6.6”

For making the double-sided insert, I began with a paper of 10” x 20.7” From there, I just duplicated the instructions on both sides of the sheet for making pleated folds. The whole insert gets folded in half and sewn in.

I also found that the original instructions call for three holes and some simple sewing, to bind the notebook. Whether sewing in my internal wallet or sewing in the notebook, I didn’t care for how loose things turned out - so I triplicated this process and made a total of 9 holes (three smaller bindings). This worked MUCH much better. You should be able to see this in one of my pictures of the blue wallet.

9 Aug 2014

Appropriate 404 page for a movie site.

Appropriate 404 page for a movie site.

22 Jul 2014

11 Jul 2014

It was such a beautiful night out.  A nice night to hike up to Balanced Rock and enjoy the cool evening air and the gorgeous vista before me.

It was such a beautiful night out. A nice night to hike up to Balanced Rock and enjoy the cool evening air and the gorgeous vista before me.

11 Jul 2014

Idaho panos…

12 Jun 2014

One of my wife’s birthday gifts - this is one of Mpix’s “metal prints” - photo is float mounted on a 1/16” aluminum sheet. My son and I snuck away to pose this shot, unbeknownst to her. Came off really nice. I shot this only using an iPhone.

One of my wife’s birthday gifts - this is one of Mpix’s “metal prints” - photo is float mounted on a 1/16” aluminum sheet. My son and I snuck away to pose this shot, unbeknownst to her. Came off really nice. I shot this only using an iPhone.

15 May 2014

My best man came to me and asked me for help on how to set up a short podcast he wanted to record.  Recordings were for his daughter’s class, as they travel in New York on a field trip.  He wanted to make his recordings and have them time-released each day of the trip - since he wouldn’t necessarily be in an area with an internet connection.

Start-to-finish, this was a fun project to help produce.  I thoroughly enjoy podcasts and think they are a fantastic medium.  I get such a kick, posting a recording and seeing it automatically pull-down on any android device or iPhone.  Publishing at its finest!

Here’s the link to his podcast; it’s first recording posts on May 17th, 2014.  It takes its inspiration from Garrison Keillor’s “The Writer’s Almanac.”

My best man came to me and asked me for help on how to set up a short podcast he wanted to record. Recordings were for his daughter’s class, as they travel in New York on a field trip. He wanted to make his recordings and have them time-released each day of the trip - since he wouldn’t necessarily be in an area with an internet connection.

Start-to-finish, this was a fun project to help produce. I thoroughly enjoy podcasts and think they are a fantastic medium. I get such a kick, posting a recording and seeing it automatically pull-down on any android device or iPhone. Publishing at its finest!

Here’s the link to his podcast; it’s first recording posts on May 17th, 2014. It takes its inspiration from Garrison Keillor’s “The Writer’s Almanac.”

29 Apr 2014

Nessun Dorma

I don’t know much about operas. In fact here’s what I have in my head:
Busty broom-hilda type ladies wearing historically inaccurate horned viking helmets and singing ballads in languages that I do not understand.

A fair understanding? No.

But I do know “Nessun Dorma”… Or I thought I did. Or at least I’m familiar with its beautiful, passionate performance thanks to Luciano Pavarotti and the many different ways commercials and movies have utilized this particular aria. I know it and like it enough to have it on my starred playlist on Spotify.

On a fluke, I recently decided to look up what the song was actually communicating. My interest soared and ascended as I read and followed the various connections leading me to the whole story of the opera. It is well worth knowing about.

"Nessun dorma" (English: "None shall sleep") is an aria from the final act of Giacomo Puccini’s opera Turandot, and is one of the best-known tenor arias in all opera. It is sung by Calaf, il principe ignoto (the unknown prince), who falls in love at first sight with the beautiful but cold Princess Turandot. However, any man who wishes to wed Turandot must first answer her three riddles; if he fails, he will be beheaded.

In the act before this aria, Calaf has correctly answered the three riddles put to all of Princess Turandot’s prospective suitors. Nonetheless, she recoils at the thought of marriage to him. Calaf offers her another chance by challenging her to guess his name by dawn. (As he kneels before her, the Nessun dorma theme makes a first appearance, to his words, “Il mio nome non sai!”) If she does so, she can execute him; but if she does not, she must marry him. The cruel and emotionally cold princess then decrees that none of her subjects shall sleep that night until his name is discovered. If they fail, all will be killed.

As the final act opens, it is now night. Calaf is alone in the moonlit palace gardens. In the distance, he hears Turandot’s heralds proclaiming her command. His aria begins with an echo of their cry and a reflection on Princess Turandot:

"Nessun dorma! Nessun dorma! Tu pure, o Principessa, nella tua fredda stanza, guardi le stelle che tremano d’amore, e di speranza!"
(English translation: “None shall sleep! None shall sleep! Even you, O Princess, in your cold bedroom, watch the stars that tremble with love and with hope!”)

"Ma il mio mistero è chiuso in me; il nome mio nessun saprà! No, No! Sulla tua bocca lo dirò quando la luce splenderà!"
(“But my secret is hidden within me; none will know my name! No, no! On your mouth I will say it when the light shines!”)

"Ed il mio bacio scioglierà il silenzio che ti fa mia!"
(“And my kiss will dissolve the silence that makes you mine!”)

Just before the climactic end of the aria, a chorus of women is heard singing in the distance:
“Il nome suo nessun saprà, E noi dovrem, ahimè, morir, morir!”
(“No one will know his name, and we will have to, alas, die, die!”)
Calaf, now certain of victory, sings:

"Dilegua, o notte! Tramontate, stelle! Tramontate, stelle! All’alba vincerò! Vincerò! Vincerò!"
(“Vanish, o night! Fade, you stars! Fade, you stars! At dawn, I will win! I will win! I will win! “)

Written in the 1920s, the opera was unfinished at the time of Puccini’s death in 1924, and was completed by Franco Alfano in 1926 - which makes this all the more interesting since the whole story of this opera is a bit of a puzzle. It makes one wonder how Puccini would’ve ended it, had he been able to complete this masterpiece.

The whole story is well worth reading and can be read in synopsis here.

16 Apr 2014

I draw what appears to me…

I draw what appears to me…

16 Apr 2014

A series of quotes that I ran with their respective speakers (exception being the “Walking Liberty,” which has no specific personification.
This was a great exploration into touching on the respective personalities of American history.

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